The Day of the Spinal Procedure

Source: The Day of the Spinal Procedure

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THE OLD BAT is going to have a spinal procedure next week.

THE OLD BAT is going to have a spinal procedure next week.

Source: THE OLD BAT is going to have a spinal procedure next week.

The Day of the Spinal Procedure

Source: The Day of the Spinal Procedure

A cry for help for the lonely

Source: A cry for help for the lonely

OLD BAT at the October book group

I hosted this meeting in place of another member, I lent my flat and asked the others to bring a plate of food.  This was successful as every one brought some thing different.  I made my usual fruit trifle and some soda bread. The evening was interesting because some of us actually read the book while others listened to it on tapes or some other audio system. We discussed the book ‘All the Ugly and Wonderful Things’ by Bryn Greenwood. Because we live in Cardiff in South Wales some of the readers thought that the author was a man because the name Bryn is a common christian name here. They had not looked at the photograph on the back cover.

The people who read, other than listened to, the book seemed to like it the most. The story is about two children in the USA being dragged up by their parents who are heavily into the illicit use and manufacture of heavy drugs. The young girl is neglected by both parents but from the age of eight is championed by an ex convict, Kellen, of part native Indian background who takes her to school every day, making sure that she has shoes on her feet and generally does all the things the parents should do. Of course the girl Wavy grows up and after the shocking murder of her parents, the story takes a blacker twist. The story deals with a strong bond developing between the older man Kellen, and the young Wavy, which comes up for public scrutiny. I will not tell you any more, but I thoroughly recommend this book. The readers gave it nine out of ten, while the audio listeners gave it eight.

The next book to read is ‘Things fall apart’ by Chinua Achebe’

Our book group is friendly, everyone is encouraged to give their opinion. We meet alternately in each other’s house or flat, the host having brought four or five books which we had voted on the month before. We then read the winning choice. We alway have a luscious tea afterwards provided by the host, with plenty of chat, putting the world to rights etc. Unfortunately members are moving on with their jobs, therefore our numbers are falling. We would like some new members. The group is mixed, men and women, old, middle-aged and young. We would welcome anyone interested in books.If this appeals to you please leave a message on The Old Bat’s blog.

The Day of the Spinal Procedure

I have to be at the hospital at twelve thirty this morning. The spinal procedure will take place during the afternoon. I was allowed a light breakfast before seven thirty, no food after that, just sips of water up until eleven.

I am writing this to pass the time and not think about food. I always want what I have been forbidden. I am not afraid of the procedure, just a bit apprehensive about the outcome.  I am not expecting miracles, I will be pleased if I can get back on the bus to go to the library, and the nearest shops. I hate being dependant on other people, everyone is so busy. My grocery shopping ‘on line’ is excellent except I always forget something important. I am pleased to say that ‘Morrisons’ is very  efficient, delivering the goods into my kitchen. This is all good, but it would be nice to browse around and pick my own groceries.  The downside is that I would spend a lot more money.

It is now  eleven o’clock, I am waiting for my friend to take me to the hospital. Yes, I am getting a bit nervous, it is showing in my typing – I have made at least four errors in the last two lines. I had better stop and pick it up again when I come back, and I will describe everything truthfully.

NEXT DAY

I will now describe what happened at the hospital yesterday. My friend picked me up with her car at exactly the right time, no worries there. We soon found the Day Surgery and I was booked in, said ‘Cheerio’ to my friend and limped off with the nurse. I was taken to a ward where there were beds with chairs beside them.  I chose to sit on the chair while they took my details and asked me a lot of questions about my medication and checking that I had not had food or drink since seven o’clock. All was well,  because of the ‘starvation’. I thought that I was going to be completely anaesthetised, but no, I was going to have a large number of injections in my back. I was a bit relieved. I was also given an explanatory leaflet, which explained in big letters that the procedure did not work in all cases. I had been warned, but I had never expected miracles,  I just hoped to be able to walk a bit better with less pain. I was  divested of my trousers and my upper clothing and put in a hospital gown. I waited for my turn  which came at three forty five. I had already noticed that the previous patients had been away from the ward for about fifteen minutes, so I expected to be back soon. I was wheeled into a small operating room where  I was introduced by my consultant, Dr Guru, to his team, three kind nurses and two handsome young assistants, who were in charge of the screen, which showed Dr Guru where to give the injections. The first thing that happened, was the removal of the clothes from my upper body. I kept my pants and socks on. I then had to lie on my tummy on the trolley, head in my hands on a pillow, not too uncomfortable. I was sprayed twice with an extremely cold solution. I heard numbers being called. eg. L3. 5. 4. All I felt were very slight pricks, which the nurses at my head warned me about before they happened. It all seemed to take a long time. After three quarters of an hour, I heard Dr Guru say that they would move to the other side, which they finished in a quarter of an hour. I went straight back to the ward where I was given a drink and some welcome ginger biscuits.

Dr Guru came to see me to tell me that the procedure had not been completely successful, they had tried very hard to locate the nerve on the left side but failed, because the bone was in the way. All was well on the right side, there was a small chance that there might be  some small improvement in my right leg, but none at all in the left leg. I thanked him for trying so hard for so long. He told me that he was passing my case on to  a spinal surgeon.

My daughter collected me and I walked to the car just as I had in the morning. Today I feel exactly the same as I did yesterday, hoping that my right leg might get better in the next few days.   Just a word to anyone who might  have this procedure in the future, there is absolutely nothing to fear, no pain at all, just very little pricks.